Curriculum Vitae

Venise Wagner, Associate Professor

San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Ave., San Francisco, CA 94132

JOURNALISM DEPARTMENT

Education

  • Master of Arts in International Policy Studies, Monterey Institute of International Studies 1987.
  • International relations, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Spring 1987, study emphasis in sociological and political changes in the last years of dictatorship.
  • Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana 1985, minor in Spanish.

 

CAREER EXPERIENCE

 Teaching

  • David Laventhol Visiting Professor, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, January 2013-June 2013.
  • Chair, Journalism Department, San Francisco State University, January 2008 – 2013.
  • Associate Professor, Journalism Department, San Francisco State University, August 2006 – Present.
  • Assistant Professor, Journalism Department, San Francisco State University, August 2001 – May 2006.
  • Adjunct Professor, Journalism Department, San Francisco State University, May 1999-August 2001.

 

Newsroom

  • Freelance writer for various publications including Parade, Mother Jones, and Hope, 1998-Present
  • Metro reporter covering issues in the San Francisco Bay Area’s black communities, San Francisco Chronicle, November 2000-January 2001; features writer June -August 2001
  • Education reporter, San Francisco Examiner, 1994-1996; metro reporter covering issues in the Bay Area’s black communities 1996-2001
  • Religion and ethics reporter, The Orange County Register, Santa Ana, Calif. 1993-1994
  • Religion and ethics reporter, The Modesto Bee, 1991-1993
  • General assignment reporter, Imperial Valley Press, El Centro, Calif. 1989-1991

 

CURRICULAR INNOVATIONS

J200 – Journalism and the Mass Media: As an introductory course for the major, it is important that students understand the significance of their role as budding journalists. In revamping the course, I kept this goal in mind in my attempts to inspire and reinvigorate interest in journalism and its role in our society. Most recently, in the Fall 2002 semester I placed this entire course on Blackboard. This was before Blackboard became automatically available university wide. I used the technology as a vehicle for unifying the class and creating class discussion among students outside of class time about the impact of mass media on our lives. Blackboard also allowed me to better manage student inquiries about assignments and reading. Because the syllabus was posted online they could always refer to it without having to hunt me down through phone calls and emails. They also had up to the minute access to their grades on Blackboard.

 

In Fall 2001 when I first began teaching the class as an adjunct, I redesigned the course to better engage students. Using rap music I asked students to analyze and deconstruct how rap music became mainstream. We examined the messages communicated in the music and how money often directs which messages make it to the mainstream. From an analysis of music we followed the industry’s ties to radio, then moved on to television and finally newspapers and magazines. By the fifth week when we covered newspapers, students had a good foundation about stereotypes in the media and were able to examine how news media help shape images about cultural groups and communities. In this section we spend a week on Tocqueville’s “Democracy in America” and examine the role of news media on the democratic process.

 

J221 – Newswriting: Since I began teaching this course as an adjunct I experimented with ways to infuse diversity into the curriculum to make it more than a footnote or one lesson for this skills class. My goal has been to challenge students’ thinking about cultural diversity beyond their comfort zones. The first semester I taught the class I used the documentary “The Color of Fear,” and had a day of round table discussion. The outcome was positive but I felt the students’ understanding of difference had to go deeper. Since then I have used a variety of handouts as primers to a discussion about diversity in the news. And on each assignment I encourage and sometimes push them to go outside of their comfort zones. This semester, after attending the Poynter Institute’s seminar on integrating diversity into the curriculum, I feel much more confident and well equipped to make diversity more than a component or module of the course. Assignments this semester will include self-examination, writing a cultural autobiography, group work, the ethics of writing about difference.

J560 (formerly J667) – Public Journalism: I developed this course first as the department’s experimental advanced writing course under the course title Civic Journalism. It became a permanent course titled Public Journalism in Fall 2004. Using principles and practices from the Pew Center for Civic Journalism designed to encourage greater civic engagement, I developed a course that would teach young journalists how to better cover disenfranchised and under covered communities. Students learn how to cultivate sources from the grass roots and to report news from the perspective of community members. This approach is a paradigm shift from conventional journalism practices that rely on the official story from policy makers and politicians. Each semester we focus on coverage of a particular community. The course debuted in Fall 2002 and we focused on environmental justice issues in the Bayview Hunters Point District of San Francisco. Working in tandem with the class was a community journalism project, which I developed to engage community members around an issue. Under the auspices of the project, we held a series of community meetings giving students an opportunity to cultivate sources and giving community members a chance to voice their concerns. Students’ stories were published on the project Web site. In Fall 2003, coverage focused on The Mission District, and the class worked in partnership with the non-profit community based organization, Accion Latina, which publishes the bimonthly, bilingual community paper El Tecolote. Students reported on immigration, housing and education issues. Exceptional stories were published in El Tecolote. In Fall 2003, I also used Blackboard to help manage information flow in the classroom. In Fall 2004 students will cover the San Antonio District of Oakland, an ethnically mixed neighborhood that faces challenges in economic development, housing, community networks and cultural interplay. With a $20,000 grant from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, students will produce a glossy magazine portraying the state of the community.

J609 – Publication Laboratory: As the lead faculty adviser to all three student publications, Xpress Newspaper, Xpress Online, Xpress Magazine, I built upon a course that needed more accountability from student reporters, better development of news judgment. Under my leadership the team of faculty advisers developed a beat system that focused on campus issues, a points-based grading system and a daily reporting system and incentives to move students toward converged media. As the lead faculty adviser I also worked with student editors to help develop their management and leadership skills.

J610 – Cultural Diversity In U.S. Journalism: I worked with Dr. Cristina Azocar, director of the Center for the Improvement and Integration of Journalism, to develop the current 1-unit course, Ethnic Diversity in U.S. Journalism, to a broader and more comprehensive 3-unit course as part of the Social Issues in the Media Segment III curriculum. The course was expanded to examine diversity not only in ethnicity and race but to also include class, religion, political ideology, disability, gender, sexual orientation and other classifications of difference. The course requires students to examine the current media structure and its role in cultivating notions of difference in our society. Students must develop strategies to address inequities in news coverage.

The Other 99 Percent: I developed this class for the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism using many teaching techniques and lessons from previously taught courses and from research I conducted during my 2012 sabbatical. Using the theoretical underpinnings of sociology, social psychology and racial discourse analysis, I created a curriculum that guides students through the process of covering structural inequities that lead to racial and class disparities.

HONORS AND AWARDS

  • Leave with Pay (Sabbatical) granted for Spring 2012 to work on “Tracking Opportunity,” a book that offers journalists tools and reporting strategies for covering racial inequity.
  • Invited and sponsored to attend the 2nd World Journalism Education Congress, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa, July 2010.
  • San Francisco State University Summer Stipend award, to begin research on Delilah Beasley, the first black columnist in California to work in a mainstream newspaper, The Oakland Tribune, June 2005.
  • Student Recognition of Excellent General Education Teaching, May 2005.
  • Student Recognition of Excellence in Advising, December 2004.
  • Secured a $20,000 grant from the Annie E. Casey Foundation to publish a glossy magazine, “Making Connections,” using students from my Public Journalism Course to provide the content. Fall 2004.
  • Invited participant in the Poynter Institute’s seminar on Integrating Diversity into the Curriculum, May 2004.
  • San Francisco State University Faculty Affirmative Action Grant, Spring 2002, to conduct a content analysis of newspaper coverage of the issue of slave reparations. $950.
  • Sundance Institute’s Arts Writing Fellowship, Spring 2002, one of 12 finalists.
  • San Francisco State University Multicultural Enhancement Grant, 2001, to develop a new course called Civic Journalism for the Journalism Department and community outreach program that would use journalism to engage residents around a community issue. $4,000.
  • San Francisco State University Community Service Learning Grant, 2001, to develop a new course called Civic Journalism for the Journalism Department and community outreach program that would use journalism to engage residents around a community issue. $3,600.
  • San Francisco State University Affirmative Action Grant, 2001, to develop a new course called Civic Journalism for the Journalism Department and community outreach program that would use journalism to engage residents around a community issue. $1,200.
  • Investigative Reporters and Editors, honorable mention for investigative reporting, for series of articles on scandals surrounding a San Francisco minister who allegedly persuaded elderly church members to mortgage their homes to help build a church, 1999.
  • Hedgebrook Writer in Residence, Whidbey Island, April-May 1997.
  • California Teachers Association, John Swett Award for feature writing on education, 1997.
  • National Association of Black Journalists third place feature, 1997.
  • National Association of Black Journalists second place feature, 1996.
  • California Teachers Association, John Swett Award for excellence  in education coverage, 1996.
  • Religion Newswriters Association’s John Supple Memorial Award, third place for excellence in reporting religion news in the secular press, 1993.

 PROFESSIONAL AND CIVIC ACTIVITIES

 Professional Leadership

  • Broadcast Webinar, “Fishing Upstream for Stories,” Oct. 5, 2011. Sponsored by the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education.  http://mije.org/maynard-institute-webinar-structural-inequity-now-available-viewing.
  • Gave workshop on incorporating diversity in the curriculum for faculty in San Francisco State University’s Journalism Department, Jan. 20, 2007.
  • Conducted a Diversity workshop for SoundVision Productions, for radio reporting in science and health. Berkeley, December 2006
  • Conducted a Diversity workshop at Columbus Council for World Affairs Journalism Youth conference. September 2006
  • Developed a Diversity Tip Sheet for the SoundVision Productions, for radio reporting workshops. Tip sheet is titled, “Integrating Diversity into Your Reporting Routine,” August, 2005.
  • Professional Freedom and Responsibility Committee Chair for the Civic and Citizen Journalism Interest Group of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, elected August 2005.
  • Led a workshop on public journalism for the Journalism Association of Community Colleges conference at San Francisco State University, October 2004 and October 2003.
  • Keynote speaker for Maynard Institute of Journalism Education’s Leadership Summit, October, 2004, San Francisco.
  • Judged contest entries for the New California Media awards, September 2004, September 2003.
  • Led workshop for community journalists in the Mission District, at Accion Latina, a San Francisco community organization, September 2004.
  • Teaching Standards Committee Chair for the Civic Journalism Interest Group of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications, elected August 2004.
  • Co-organized the Society of Professional Journalists’ West-Coast Multicultural Writers Editors Conference in San Francisco and Oakland. This two-day conference, sponsored by the Northern California chapter, matches national magazine editors in one-on-one conferences with writers of color and writers of multicultural issues. July 2004 and September 2003.
  • Judged contest entries for the Society of Professional Journalists’ Excellence  in Journalism awards, August 2004 and 2003.
  • Co-led newswriting session at the Youth Alcohol and Journalism Workshop, March 2003.
  • Collaborated on the Maynard Institute for Education and Freedom Forum oral history project on black journalists who broke through white dominated newsrooms in the 1960s, February-April 2002.
  • Helped develop Society of Professional Journalists’ diversity teaching module, Fall 2002.
  • Led a journalism writing workshop for the Sierra Club, November 2002.
  • Led workshop on framing stories and newspaper writing for Maynard Institute of Journalism Education Conference on Media Convergence,  January 2002.
  • Speaker for the Bay Area Multicultural Media Academy sponsored by the Center for the Improvement and Integration of Journalism, Summer 2000, 2001, 2002.
  • Panelist on, “Multiculturalism in the Newsroom, Bridging the Diversity Gap,” National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association, San Francisco, 2000.
  • Committee member of the Diversity Caucus at the San Francisco Examiner, which organized a series of round tables in the newsroom as part of the Diversity Time Out of the American Society of Newspaper Editors, 1999 and 2000.
  • Helped develop the Society of Professional Journalists’ Rainbow Sourcebook, a project designed to broaden the pool of sources available to reporters around the country, 1999.
  • Diversity Caucus member of the Society of Professional Journalists Northern California Chapter, 1999.
  •  Panelist on, “Diversity in News Coverage’’ an examination of code words, charged language and racial bias in news coverage, Society of Professional Journalists, Los Angeles, 1998.
  •  One of eight organizers who revived the Diversity Caucus at the San Francisco Examiner, 1998.

PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENT AND GROWTH

 Works in Progress

  • “Tracking Opportunity” – Working title of edited book examining how journalists can better cover issues of disparity in education, health, housing, wealth/economy. Received a sabbatical to work on this project. One publisher has expressed interest, but during the sabbatical, will work on a chapter and the proposal.
  • Refining the narrative thread of “Reaping Dreams from Sorrow’s Fields,” an historical novel about the black pioneers who founded the town Allensworth in California’s Central Valley. Their aim, to prove to society that African American could prosper in an environment without discrimination, met with resistance as local water wars persisted in the area. 250 pages completed.

Presentations

  • Juried panelist presenting, “Probing Race: Racial Discourse Analysis in Journalism Practices, an Ethical Approach,” at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Washington, D.C., August 2013.
  • Non-juried panelist on “It’s Data Hunting Season” at the Online News Association annual conference, presented ways to use Database reporting to expose structural racism and inequities, Online News Association, Oct. 2, 2009.
  • Non-juried panelists on “All in a Fishbowl: Campus Initiatives with Community Newspapers” at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, San Francisco, August 2006.
  • Non-juried panelist on, “Beyond the Usual Sources,” at the Society of Professional Journalists National Convention, Las Vegas, October 2005.
  • Juried panelist presenting, “Slave Reparations dismissed in the news: An examination of reparations coverage in daily U.S. newspapers,” at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, San Antonio, TX, August 2005.
  • Non-juried panelists on, “Disturbing Images and the Internet: Self Censorship Versus the “Real World,” at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, San Antonio, TX, August 2005.
  • Non-juried panelist on, “When the Classroom Isn’t Always a Classroom: Teaching in the Trenches (Literally),” at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, San Antonio, TX, August 2005.
  • Non-juried panelist on, “Beyond Belief: Religious Commitment and Extremism,” part of a public dialogue series for the “People’s Temple” performance at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre, May 2005.
  • Juried panelist presenting, “Segregated by Choice: A California Black Colony’s Educational Campaign Mired in the Dubois-Washington Debate,” at the Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities, History Division, Honolulu, January 2005.
  • Keynote speaker at the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education Leadership Summit, presenting findings from analysis of Reparations coverage in mainstream newspapers, at the San Francisco Chronicle, October 9, 2004.
  • Non-juried panelist on, “Getting the Bias Out,” at the Society of Professional Journalists National Convention, New York, September 11, 2004.
  • Non-juried panelist on, “Making the Classes Count: Instituting Diversity in the Curriculum,” Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications, Toronto, August 2004.
  • Non-juried panelist on, “Making Diversity Come Alive in the Journalism Classroom,” Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications, Toronto, August 2004.
  • Moderator for panel, “Book Stories: How to get your book idea published” at the Society of Professional Journalists West Coast Multicultural Writers Editors Conference, Oakland, July 2004.
  • Moderator for media ethics panel, The Gay and Lesbian Alliance  Against Defamation, April, 2004.
  • Moderator for panel, “Know Your Market,” part of the Society of Professional Journalists Northern California Chapter’s West Coast Multicultural Writers Editors Conference, September 2003.
  • Non-juried panelist on, “Multiculturalism in the Newsroom, Bridging the Diversity Gap,” National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association, San Francisco, September 2000.
  • Non-juried panelist on, “Diversity in New Coverage,” an examination of code words, charged language and racial bias in news coverage, Society of Professional Journalists, Los Angeles, October 1998.

Publications

Professional and Academic

  • “Activities Among Negroes”: Race Pride and a Call for Interracial Dialogue in California’s East Bay Region, 1920-1931, Journalism History, July 2009.
  • “Improving Cross-Cultural Reporting in Your Community,” Diversity Module for Society of Professional Journalist/Bloomberg Journalism Training Program, August, 2005.
  • “Josephine Leavell,” contribution to the African American National Biography, a joint project of the W.E.B. DuBois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University and Oxford Press. To be published in 2008.
  • “Reparations Not in the News,” Center for the Integration and Improvement of Journalism Web site, November 11, 2004.
  • “Toward Greater Diversity,” Civic Journalism Interest Group News, Summer 2004.
  • “Roadmap to Retention,” an article that examines the findings of three studies on recruitment and retention of minorities in mainstream newsrooms. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education, June 25, 2003.
  • “Finding News – And Audience – in Ethnic Niche,” article about New California Media study on ethnic news organizations’ role in ethnic communities. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education Web site, January 9, 2003.
  • “Do We Check It At the Door,” an article about a study of minority editors and newspaper executives and the environment that requires them be non-ethnic. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education Web site, August 28, 2002.
  • “The Black Journalists Movement,” a series of articles based on oral histories of some of the black journalists who broke the color line in major newspapers around the country. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education Web site, 2002.

 

Opinion

  • “The election’s immigrant factor. Politicians praise America, but blacks must confront its failings,” San Francisco Chronicle, September 12, 2004, pg. E3.

 

Magazines

  • “A Toehold in the Market – Choosing a transitional neighborhood over permanent renting,” San Francisco Chronicle Magazine, January 8, 2006, pg. 5.
  •  “Sisters Rising. Lateefah Simon is educating a new group of experts to solve tough social problems: the young women affected by them,” Hope magazine, July/August 2004.
  •  “New Drug Benefits. Victoria Hale is writing a new prescription for thousands who lack affordable medicine,” Hope magazine, May/June 2004.
  •  “Natural Businessman. Bill Shireman offers self-help to big corporations seeking environmental responsibility as well as market share,” Hope magazine, November/December 2003.
  •  “Liberating Theology. For many, San Francisco’s Tenderloin is ground zero for destitution and despair. But for Cecil Williams and Janice Mirikitani it’s fertile ground for love and recovery,” Hope magazine, September/October 2003.
  •  “Tookie Williams Showing His True Colors,” Mother Jones, March/April 2001.
  •  “King & Country. Stanford historian Claybourne Carson’s latest work sheds new light on the life – and legacy – of Martin Luther King,” San Francisco Examiner Magazine, January 3, 1999.
  •  “Birmingham Sunday. Spike Lee’s powerful new documentary recalls 1963 church bombing,” San Francisco Examiner Magazine, September 28, 1997.
  •  “Crossover. The rest of America is still deeply divided by race. So how come so many white suburban youths want to be black?” San Francisco Examiner Magazine, November 10, 1996.

 

Newspaper Features

  • “Power in Prose. Poor magazine gives voice to have nots,” San Francisco Chronicle, April 19, 2002.
  •  “Tough Talk. San Quentin inmates try to deter troubled young men from crime,” San Francisco Chronicle, January 18, 2002.
  •  “Straight Outta Hunters Point. Kevin Epps bleak documentary shows the disintegration of a place he has called home for 30 years,” San Francisco Chronicle, June 29, 2001.
  •  “Practicing Peace. In a North Richmond enclave, troubled kids learn not to fight,” San Francisco Chronicle, December 2000.
  •  “Hoops in Hawaii open doors at home,” San Francisco Examiner, September 29, 2000.
  • “MLK. Michael Eric Dyson tries to bring King’s genius to hip-hop generation,” San Francisco Examiner, February 16, 2000.
  • “Stand-in Visionary. Carving Ralph Ellison’s ‘Juneteenth’ out of 1,500 pages of unfinished manuscript was a labor of love that will only whet readers’ appetites,” San Francisco Examiner, June 20, 1999.
  • “Uplift, One Girl At A Time. Sunnydale after-school program giving black girls a better sense of who they are,” San Francisco Examiner, October 25, 1998.
  • “A Beloved Writer. Toni Morrision makes a present of her wisdom and humor on two Bay Area audiences,” San Francisco Examiner, July 29, 1998.
  • “Reading, Writing and Race. One African American’s struggle to achieve in the world of science represents a larger, racial divide,” San Francisco Examiner, February 9, 1997.
  • “Blacks Still Rare in Upper Reaches of Math, Science,” San Francisco Examiner, February 2, 1997.
  • “Blacks Seeking to Put Academics At the Top of the List,” San Francisco Examiner, February 1, 1997
  • “Rwanda Encounter. Desperate refugees greet Bay Area water supplies,” San Francisco Examiner, July 28, 1994.

 

Investigative

  • “Awaiting Miracles In The Bayview. Congregation has faith that troubled church will be saved,” San Francisco Examiner, December 28, 1998.
  • “Parishioner wonder: Who is this man? As embezzlement trial opens, Rev. McCall remains, for many, a million-dollar secret,” San Francisco Examiner, September 6, 1998.
  • “Church Files For Bankruptcy. With pastor jailed on fraud charges, legal action prevents scheduled auction of its property,” July 1, 1998.
  • “Jailed Pastor’s Loyalists Forming Breakaway Church. Lock out dissidents, file incorporation papers with state,” June 23, 1998.
  • “Arson Added to Pastor’s Charges. Pleads not guilty to setting fire to his S.F. apartment,” San Francisco Examiner, June 17, 1998.
  • “Bayview Pastor Arraigned For Theft. His divided flock crowds courtroom; visiting preacher backs him pulpit,” San Francisco Examiner, June 15, 1998.
  • “Minister’s Flock Reels At Arrest,” San Francisco Examiner,  June 14, 1998.
  • “S.F. Pastor Charged With Theft. $1 million bail for Bayview minister suspected of bilking parishioners,” San Francisco Examiner, June 12, 1998.
  • “Pastor Had Legal Woes in Alabama. Minister facing S.F. probe was sued by deacons of church in South,” San Francisco Examiner, February 8, 1998.
  • “Giving It All To The Church. Congregants put up cash for building, but may lose homes,” San Francisco Examiner, January 25, 1998.

 

Computer Assisted Reporting

  • “State Teacher’s Pay Not Grade A. Most still making less than in ‘87,” San Francisco Examiner, March 10, 1996.
  • “How Oakland Pay Scale Favors New Teachers. District’s beginning salaries high, but lag with experience,” San Francisco Examiner, February 21, 1996.
  • “Union: District Too Top-Heavy,” San Francisco Examiner, February 19, 1996.

 

Education

  • “Coming Correct on Black English. Misperceptions about African American speech challenged,” San Francisco Examiner, April 18, 2000.
  • “Black Students Float Between Worlds of Words. One they see as their own, the other as someone else’s,” San Francisco Examiner, January 5, 1997.
  • “State Has Run Own ‘Ebonics’ Program Since ’81,” San Francisco Examiner, December 29, 1996.
  • “Dreams Shared and Lost. Helping poor kids get to college seemed like a great idea, but…,” San Francisco Examiner, August 4, 1996.
  • “Educators Lay Blame for S.F. Dropouts. Blacks, Latinos quit at higher rate,” June 17, 1996.
  • “Black English Finds Place in Classroom. Teachers, students say Ebonics eases learning,” April 29, 1996.
  • “Schooled in Black Culture. Pilot program in S.F. steeps young students in African American history, customs, language,” San Francisco Examiner, April 28, 1996.
  • “S.F.’s Special Problem. Unusually high number of black students in classes for learning disabled,” San Francisco Examiner, June 4, 1995.
  • “Bilingual Class: A New Approach. But Critics Worry Program Leading to Segregation,” San Francisco Examiner, December 19, 1994.
  • “Why S.F. Schools Face Race Quota Suit. Chinese Americans say plan hinders their children,” San Francisco Examiner, July 12, 1994.
  • “Admission Quotas Hinder Education, S.F. Suit Says,” San Francisco Examiner, July 12, 1994.
  • “S.F. Sued over school admission quotas. Desegregation effort ‘failed miserably,’ Chinese American group maintains in bid for more access,” San Francisco Examiner, July 11, 1994.
  • “Unlocking Mysteries of Math For All Kids. Algebra Project targets minorities,” San Francisco Examiner, July 8, 1994.

 

News

  • “Blacks Losing Clout In S.F. Population decline, failure to cultivate young leaders blamed,” San Francisco Examiner, October 29, 2000.
  • “Court Hits Hard at Domestic Violence. Agencies coordinate to break through delusions of batterers and their victims,” San Francisco Examiner, November 23, 1997.
  • “Grocery Squeeze In Inner Cities. Residents pay more for poorer quality as big chains stay away,” San Francisco Examiner, October 28, 1997.
  • “AIDS Programs for E. Bay Blacks Lose U.S. Funds. Centers of Disease Control accused of abandoning groups,” San Francisco Examiner, September 10, 1997.
  • “Suspect died at bickering delayed calls for medics,” San Francisco Examiner, June 22, 1995.
  • “From Panthers to politics: A radical runs for office,” San Francisco Examiner, May 16, 1999.

 

Religion

  • “Growing or Just Aging. The black church’s clergy ages and young men slip away. Can including women and seeking young, more-educated ministers keep churches vibrant?” The Orange Country Register, March 8, 1994.
  • “Faith in the Future. The black church tries to redefine its role by reviving its historical mission of providing services to the black community,” The Orange Country Register, March 7, 1994.
  • “Islam drawing young blacks,” The Orange Country Register, March 7, 1994.
  • “Oasis of Comfort. For many black Orange County residents, churches offer spiritual solace, as well as refuge from cultural isolation,” The Orange Country Register, March 6, 1994.
  • “Racism fueled growth. Many blacks were disillusioned by the gap between doctrine and practice in the Methodist Church in the 18th century,” The Orange Country Register, March 6, 1994.
  • “O.C. Ethics slip-sliding away. One in four Orange Country residents can’t point to a single positive role model. Politicians and celebrities get the worst rap,” The Orange Country Register, January 9, 1994.
  • “Pope praises Vietnamese for unity, courage. John Paul II tells expatriates to prepare for the future of the church and their native land,” The Orange Country Register, August 16, 1993.
  • “Between two worlds. Cambodian immigrants embrace two religions,” The Modesto Bee, September 13, 1992.

CONTRIBUTIONS TO CAMPUS

  • Served as senator of the Academic Senate – Fall 2009 -Spring 2012.
  • Served on university committee for Graduation and Student Success – Fall 2011-Present.
  • Served on university search committee for Dean of Faculty Affairs – Spring 2011.
  • Served on university search committee for VP University of Advancement – Fall 2009.
  • Served as chair of the Journalism Department, January 2008 – Present.
  • Served as chair of the Journalism Department’s Hiring Committee, 2006-07 academic year.
  • Served as chair of the Journalism Department’s Retention Tenure Promotions Committee, Fall 2006.
  •  Led and organized Journalism Department in the development of a five-year strategic plan, 2005-06 and 2006-07 academic years.
  •  Served on the Journalism Department’s Curriculum Committee, Fall 2004.
  •  Served as chair of the Diversity Committee to the Journalism Department, 2003-04 academic year.
  •  Served as College of Humanities academic adviser Fall 2003 semester.
  • Represented the Journalism Department in the Convocation Honors ceremony, Spring 2003.
  •  Served as faculty adviser to the student chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists, 2002-03 academic year.
  •  Served as chair of the Journalism Department’s Curriculum Committee, Spring 2003.
  •  Served on the Journalism Department’s hiring committee for a tenure track position, Spring 2003.
  •  Brought in a series of guest speakers for the campus and the Journalism Department including renowned journalists Bill Kovach founder of the Committee for Concerned Journalists: Journalists, Reese Erlich, co-author of “Target Iraq,” and John Diaz, Editorial Page.
  • Editor of the San Francisco Chronicle in Fall 2002 and Spring 2003.
  •  Served as member of the Academic Affirmative Action Committee, starting Fall 2002 to Spring 2004.
  •  Served on the Journalism Department’s hiring committee for two ad sales representatives for student publications, Xpress, Fall 2002.
  •  Helped organize the Advisory Board to the Journalism Department, Spring 2002.
  •  Served on the hiring committee to replace the computer and systems administrator, Spring 2002.
  •  Reviewed faculty and staff surveys of the Journalism Chair and wrote the Chair Review Report, Spring 2002.
  •  Advised Journalism students, San Francisco State Journalism Department, Spring 2001 – Present.
  •  Served on the Journalism Department’s Accreditation Committee, Spring 2001.

CONTRIBUTIONS TO COMMUNITY

  • Featured panelist for the Northern California Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists’ Town Hall discussion “The State of Bay Area Media,” March 25, 2010.
  • Featured panelist on WAMC, Northeast Public Radio, to discuss Diversity in the News, June 27, 2006.
  • Served as a delegate for Media Alliance to encourage better election coverage on KGO and KPIX television newscasts, September 29, 2004.
  • Worked with Media Alliance  to organize Media Reform panel and fundraiser featuring noted author and communications scholar, Robert McChesney, May 2004.
  • Visiting Lecturer with the Justice in Journalism Institute, San Francisco, April, 2004
  • Moderated panel on coverage of same-sex marriage in mainstream press for Gay and
  • Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation, San Francisco, April, 2004.
  • Spoke to journalism students at Oakland High School, September 2003.
  • Led writing workshops on the environment for fourth graders at Malcolm X Academy in the Bayview Hunters Point, March-April, 2003. These workshops were part of a collaborative project with the Bayview Opera House Environmental Education Program.
  • Featured guest on KALW Radio’s City Visions Radio to discuss the impact of the FCC Deregulation ruling, June 2003.
  • Hosted three community forums in the Bayview Hunters Point around the issue of environmental racism, Fall 2002.
  • Led a series of writing workshops for residents in the San Antonio neighborhood of Oakland who are publishing a small community paper, Summer and Fall 2002.
  • Featured guest on the KPOO Radio’s, “Connecting the Dots” program to discuss the Civic Journalism course at San Francisco State, November and December 2002.
  • Oversaw the design of the San Francisco Community Journalism Project Web site, which hosted student coverage of communities. The Web site also has history and facts of interest for the first neighborhood we’re starting with, Spring 2002.
  • Designed and coordinated the San Francisco Community Journalism Project, using journalism to engage communities around issues that affect them directly, Spring 2002.
  • Numerous appearances on KQED’s “This Week in Northern California,” 1995 – 1998.

 

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